Archive for May 11, 2012

Auntie Zeituni has written a book. It’s called “Tears of Abuse,” on account of how tough she’s had it.

Have I read it? Of course not. Have you read her nephew’s best-seller — Dreams from My Ghostwriter, I mean Father? No one has — it’s sold millions of copies, but until two weeks ago, not a single reader got far enough into it to learn that Obama was a dog-eater with “composite” girlfriends.

Anyway, I have the press release on “Tears of Abuse,” which describes Auntie Zeituni’s journey to the United States “where she faces the unthinkable; failing health and quarantined in a hospital while on vacation in a foreign country.”

Vacation? Surely she meant to say “welfare.”

“As her story unfolds she becomes a resident of (a) homeless shelter and a subject of deportation.”

How dare they! Just because she’s an illegal alien, they want to deport her.

Have they forgotten the immortal words of Marsha Coakley: “Technically it is not illegal to be illegal in Massachusetts.”

And if you don’t believe Marsha, just ask Uncle Omar, Auntie Zeituni’s brother, or half-brother, or whatever. Technically, it is also apparently not illegal to be driving drunk illegally in Massachusetts, at least if you’re an illegal alien.

Auntie Zeituni was victimized in Kenya but, believe it or not, “she was later victimized in the U.S.”

Talk about victimization — do you realize, you actually have to go down to the welfare office to apply for the dole? The welfare office doesn’t make house calls. Not yet anyway. Her nephew hasn’t been re-elected.

But Auntie Zeituni’s story has a happy ending.

“ ‘Tears of Abuse’ reveals how this remarkable woman turns the unfathomable into triumph.”

Public housing, on the dole — what else would you call it but a triumph? The inscription at the base of the Statue of Liberty needs to be rewritten. Forget the huddled masses yearning to “breathe free.” Now the huddled masses demand to “live free.”

Read more here.

The mom on the latest cover of Time magazine said Friday she didn’t expect such a strong public reaction to the photo of her breastfeeding her 3-year-old son.

“I don’t think any of us were expecting it,”Jamie Lynne Grumet said, appearing on NBC’s “Today” with her son Aram.

The cover, meant to illustrate the philosophy of “attachment parenting,” went viral Thursday and sparked debate about breastfeeding children past babyhood — and the appropriateness of depicting it on a national magazine.

But Grumet said she wanted to make a point, and for that, “we knew exactly what we were going to get into.” She said she herself was breastfed until she was six years old, making her family “basically one of the better families to handle this.”

According to LAist, the Los Angeles mom has a blog, “I Am Not the Baby-Sitter,” and has written about breastfeeding her adopted Ethiopian son in addition to her biological child:

“When I asked him if he would also like to breastfeed he smiled and jumped right on my lap. Our first experience breastfeeding you could tell his was an old pro. It was clear it was something he missed dearly. Something from home I was able to give him.”

Read more here.

House Democrats received training this week on how to raise the issue of race to defend government programs, according to training materials obtained by The Washington Examiner.

The prepared content of a Tuesday presentation to the House Democratic Caucus and staff indicates that Democrats will seek to portray apparently neutral free-market rhetoric as being charged with racial bias, conscious or unconscious.

In her distributed remarks, Maya Wiley of the Center for Social Inclusion criticized “conservative messages [that are] racially ‘coded’ and had images of people of color that we commonly see used” and proposed tactics for countering the Republicans’ (presumably) racially-coded rhetoric.

According to Wiley’s group’s website, “right-wing rhetoric has dominated debates of racial justice – undermining efforts to create a more equal society, and tearing apart the social safety net in the process” for over 25 years. Wiley had been invited to run the Democrats “through their strategy and how they message and talk about stuff” pertaining to race and fiscal policy, a staffer for Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., explained.

As samples of race-coded rhetoric, Wiley reminded the Democrats of statements by Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich. Of Gingrich’s famous comment about President Obama, her distributed remarks note, “Calling a Black man ‘the food stamp president’ is not a race-neutral statement, even if Newt Gingrich did not intend racism.”

Read more here.

Eduardo Saverin, the billionaire co- founder of Facebook Inc. (FB), renounced his U.S. citizenship before an initial public offering that values the social network at as much as $96 billion, a move that may reduce his tax bill.

Facebook plans to raise as much as $11.8 billion through the IPO, the biggest in history for an Internet company. Saverin’s stake is about 4 percent, according to the website Who Owns Facebook. At the high end of the IPO valuation, that would be worth about $3.84 billion. His holdings aren’t listed in Facebook’s regulatory filings.

Saverin, 30, joins a growing number of people giving up U.S. citizenship, a move that can trim their tax liabilities in that country. The Brazilian-born resident of Singapore is one of several people who helped Mark Zuckerberg start Facebook in a Harvard University dorm and stand to reap billions of dollars after the world’s largest social network holds its IPO.

“Eduardo recently found it more practical to become a resident of Singapore since he plans to live there for an indefinite period of time,” said Tom Goodman, a spokesman for Saverin, in an e-mailed statement.

Saverin’s name is on a list of people who chose to renounce citizenship as of April 30, published by the Internal Revenue Service. Saverin renounced his U.S. citizenship “around September” of last year, according to his spokesman.

Singapore doesn’t have a capital gains tax. It does tax income earned in that nation, as well as “certain foreign- sourced income,” according to a government website on tax policies there.

Read more here.

While giving a talk to Georgetown University’s Labor Lab on April 30th, renown Community Organizer Steven Learner boasted some peculiar parenting accomplishments, while bringing into question his version of the Jewish tradition of Bar Mitzvah.

Lerner began his speech by bragging about his disruption of Washington DC in the Justice for Janitors campaign of the 80‘s and 90’s:

”Do people know about when we shut down Washington, D.C.? Does anybody know that story? So we had this idea to get– that if we couldn’t picket the buildings anymore because of secondary boycott law, maybe we should just shut the city down. So we parked school buses across the bridges into the city and set up classrooms to symbolize that pacts weren’t being paid, and the schools were in deterioration.”

He then announced a point of personal importance and pride over the protest:

“An important event in my life because my oldest son got arrested for his first time. And it was very big event, [we're] joking now that the leftist bar mitzvah is when your son gets arrested for the first time. And he then– just a great side story– at our local elementary school my youngest son, they said during story time, “do you have anything to share?” And he said, “yes, my brother went to jail last night.” And the teacher said, “Oh, that’s ok it happens to all of us, you know it will get worked out.” And my youngest son said, “We’re so proud.”