GOP Voters at All-Time High

According to new research released today by Rasmussen, more voters identify themselves as Republican than ever in the last 8 years. More importantly, by a 4 point margin, more voters identify as GOP than Democrat. This is the largest spread between the parties ever. Worse for Democrats, the number of voters who identify with their party is also approaching an historic low.

In August, 37.6% of voters identified themselves as Republican. That is up from 34.9% in July. By contrast, just 33.3% of voters identify themselves as Democrats. That is very near their historic low in February, when 32.4% of voters identified as Democrat. The 4.3 margin in favor of the GOP is the biggest gap ever between the parties. In November 2010, when the GOP won a landslide in the mid-term elections, their advantage was just 1.3 points.

Immediately prior to Obama’s inauguration, the Democrat party held a nearly 9 point edge over Republicans. Over 41% of voters called themselves Democrats then, compared to around 32% who were Republicans. It is a stunning reversal as Obama heads into reelection.

The last time GOP was close to this level was September 2004. President Bush went on to win reelection two months later, with an electorate that was evenly split. Even then, more voters called themselves Democrats then, but the party’s advantage over the GOP was just over 1 point.

Read more here.

New Paul S.C. ad hits Santorum on ‘betrayal’

Ron Paul’s campaign is out with this new ad in South Carolina, which hits Rick Santorum on his “record of betrayal.”

“One serial hypocrite exposed,” the ad says, showing clips of Newt Gingrich. “Now another has emerged: Rick Santorum, a corporate lobbyist and Washington politician. A record of betrayal.”

This is the first time Paul has hit Santorum on TV so far, and looks a great deal like the anti-Gingrich ads the Paul camp ran in Iowa. Those ads helped bring Gingrich’s numbers down before the caucuses, and brutal ads from a campaign that has money to spend could have a similar effect on Santorum.

The Paul campaign is spending $250,000 on the ad buy, a source tells us, and the ad will run in South Carolina starting Monday.

Read more here.

Governor Of The Year

In 2011, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker(R) served as the embodiment of the state by state battle to balance budgets and the best symbol of the struggle between the two political parties about how best to meet those fiscal challenges. His first year will extend well into his second year, quite likely culminating in a recall election to remove him from office.

He has dominated the political debate on both sides. Defining the issues. He is cited by both Democrats and Republicans as the best of example of what is wrong, or what is right with a conservative approach to government. Although they will never admit it, many Democratic governors are different from Walker only in a matter of degrees.

Nearly every governor, regardless of party, began the year saying the current path of expensive pension and benefit packages for public employees is unsustainable. The way the issue exploded in Wisconsin is as much a function of the legal and legislative tools at Walker’s disposal as it is about the specific route he chose to take.

This is why Governors Journal has selected Scott Walker as the 2011 Governor of the Year.

It is not accurate to say Scott Walker launched an unannounced attack on public employees. For decades, state and local government leaders have complained about government employee unions: Collective bargaining, growing benefit packages, under-funded pension systems and binding arbitration. The warning siren had howled.

As Idaho Governor Butch Otter(R) observed in one interview this year, the changes that occurred in 2011 could not have happened in the absence of the national economic collapse. In politics, things change when a crisis necessitates change.

That was the case this year in Wisconsin and elsewhere. Years of complaining about the problem led to action in state after state. Walker was faced with a larger crisis in Wisconsin, in large part, because the unions fighting his proposal to curtail collective bargaining rights had the help of a small group of Senate Democrats who fled the state, preventing a vote, for several weeks, as pro-union forces took over the Capitol in support.

Read more here.

Ron Paul forecast ‘race war’ in ad for newsletter

Rueters:

The eight-page letter, which appears to carry Paul’s signature at the end, also warns that the U.S. government’s redesign of currency to include different colors – a move aimed at thwarting counterfeiters – actually was part of a plot to allow the government to track Americans using the “new money.”

The letter urges readers to subscribe to Paul’s newsletters so that he could “tell you how you can save yourself and your family” from an overbearing government.

The letter’s details emerge at a time when Paul, now a contender for the Republican nomination for president, is under fire over reports that his newsletters contained racist, anti-homosexual and anti-Israel rants.

Why we need the Republican Party

I was amused to read The Daily Times editorial, “Tax hikes would hurt” on Nov. 1. The description of our “lame duck” governor’s proposals to triple the Flush Tax, add 15 cents to the gas tax and increase car registration and emission fees by 50 percent is typical for a politician on the way out.

One wonders if our esteemed leader would be so thus inclined if he were running for re-election.

On the same page of the newspaper, butted up to the tax hike opinion article, appeared Donald G. Griffin’s view that “Republicans and George Bush have caused our problems.” His solution is to eliminate the GOP — “they have been around for too long.”

Mr. Griffin’s shortsighted view is lopsided, to say the least.

May I be so bold as to describe what the country would look like if we got rid of the GOP. It would look like Maryland on a grander scale.

Ralph Cordrey

Sharptown

Bachmann, Trump to host ‘tele-townhall’

GOP presidential contender Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) will participate in a “tele-townhall” with New York businessman Donald Trump on Monday.

“This is an incredible opportunity for you and everyone from Team Bachmann to hear from a businessman who knows firsthand that Barack Obama’s failed policies are crippling our nation’s job creators,” said Bachmann in an email to supporters.

“Donald Trump and I will discuss the state of the race, along with the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead,” she added.

During the tele-townhall scheduled for 8 p.m. ET on Oct. 17, Bachmann and Trump will answer questions from the audience.

Trump considered entering the GOP race earlier in the year and has yet to close the door on a possible presidential bid.

GOP candidates have traveled to New York to meet with the business mogul to seek his advice and possible endorsement.

Read more here.