The Star Spangled Banner, like you’ve never heard it

The Star Spangled Banner, like you’ve never heard it.

Star-Spangled Banner and the War of 1812

The original Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that would become our national anthem, is among the most treasured artifacts in the collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

Star-Spangled Banner

Quick Facts about the Star-Spangled Banner Flag:

    • Made in Baltimore, Maryland, in July-August 1813 by flagmaker Mary Pickersgill
    • Commissioned by Major George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry
    • Original size: 30 feet by 42 feet
    • Current size: 30 feet by 34 feet
    • Fifteen stars and fifteen stripes (one star has been cut out)
    • Raised over Fort McHenry on the morning of September 14, 1814, to signal American victory over the British in the Battle of Baltimore; the sight inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner”
    • Preserved by the Armistead family as a memento of the battle
    • First loaned to the Smithsonian Institution in 1907; converted to permanent gift in 1912
    • On exhibit at the National Museum of American History since 1964
    • Major, multi-year conservation effort launched in 1998
    • Plans for new permanent exhibition gallery now underway

Learn more: http://www.si.edu/Encyclopedia_SI/nmah/starflag.htm

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6 thoughts on “The Star Spangled Banner, like you’ve never heard it”

  1. These are facts that our children and grandchildren as well as all the “new comers” to our great country should be taught! Thank you for sharing ‘TRUTH’………..Debbie Scelza

  2. Even though I received this the day after the fourth it bought tears to my eyes, we should be reminded of our fantastic history daily, and be proud of the people who fought for our freedom.

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