When the Lights Go Out in America

As America prepares to celebrate the ringing in of 2013 and the reelection of a Marxist as President, I think we should also review the EMP threat before America’s lights go out. Notice, I did not say “if.” It’s a matter of “when.” I’ve had many on both sides of the aisle ridicule my statements on the threats from Russia and China. Well, the despots may have the last laugh. Add to those two, Iran and North Korea, as well as a string of smaller despotic countries and you have a threat unparalleled in history just waiting to bring America down once and for all.

The Progressives are not stupid, they know the threat is real. As they poo-poo the possibility of an EMP, please realize that these elitists feel they are prepared with their money and retreats. They may even be stealth preppers, but trust me… no one is fully prepared for an EMP attack. Aside from the obvious lack of electricity after such an attack, few realize that millions would die and rather quickly – and death will come for the poor and rich, the middle class and the elite – death is not picky, just opportunistic.

No food delivery would cause starvation to become the norm. Cannibalism will become a reality, not just a nightmare.
The lack of medicine and medical care would cause death for many even over what we consider to be minor ills.
Thousands would have withdrawals from medication running out, which would cause even more death and mayhem. Depression, insanity and desperation will set in.
The strong and evil would go on foraging treks and kill anyone who got in their way or just for the heck of it.
Government and authority would quickly break down and only those who have prepared for security and protection have a chance of surviving.
Without heat in the winter, many, many will freeze to death.
Lack of sanitation will cause disease to run rampant, as will the lack of medicine and medical care.
Increasingly scarce clean water will become a matter of life and death.

Those are just a few of the challenges we will need to meet when the lights go out. Think about it.

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Knife-wielding man injures 22 children in China

A knife-wielding man slashed 22 children and an adult at an elementary school in central China on Friday, state media reported, the latest in a series of attacks on schoolchildren in the country.

The man attacked the children at the gate of a school in Chenpeng village in Henan province, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Police arrested a 36-year-old man, identified as villager Min Yingjun, Xinhua said. It did not give further details of the extent of the injuries.

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Chinese airplane enters Japanese airspace over Senkakus for 1st time

A Chinese government airplane entered Japanese airspace over the disputed Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea on Thursday in the first such airspace intrusion in Japan, prompting an immediate protest from the Japanese government.

The Air Self-Defense Force scrambled F-15 fighter jets to the area after one of China’s State Oceanic Administration airplanes was spotted at 11:06 a.m. about 15 kilometers south of Uotsuri Island, one of the Japanese-administered Senkakus claimed by China, Chief Cabinet Secretary Osamu Fujimura told reporters.

It is the first-ever intrusion by China into Japanese airspace since Tokyo started tallying the number of such intrusions in 1958, according to the Defense Ministry.

Four Chinese maritime surveillance vessels entered Japanese waters around the disputed islands in Okinawa Prefecture in the morning, marking the third straight day Chinese government ships have entered the waters, the Japan Coast Guard said.

Tokyo immediately filed a protest with Beijing after the airspace intrusion, Fujimura said, adding that it is “extremely deplorable” that the incident occurred on top of the intrusion by the Chinese ships, which lasted about six hours.

“We are determined to deal firmly with action that violates our country’s sovereignty in accordance with domestic laws and regulations,” the top government spokesman added.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda instructed relevant government offices to take further caution in warning and surveillance activities, he said.

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Chinese don’t take any crap from their Muslim (Uighur) population

As America Taxes People to Death, China Lowers Taxes

China’s new round of structural tax cutting is likely to benefit more than 900,000 enterprises nationwide, according to a working conference held here on Monday to discuss the country’s piloting of replacing business tax with a value-added tax (VAT).

About 710,000 enterprises have been covered by the tax-cutting program, and another 200,000 will be included starting from Dec.1 this year, according to the meeting jointly held by the Ministry of Finance and the State Administration of Taxation.

Shanghai piloted the program on Jan. 1 this year in an effort to decrease the overall tax burden and boost the transportation and service sectors. The pilot was then expanded to provincial regions including Beijing, Guangdong and Zhejiang later this year.

Tianjin, Hubei, Zhejiang and Ningbo will also join the program from next month, under previous plans.

All the works are progressing in an orderly and effectively manner, and the performances of the launched pilot programs have exceeded previous expectations, said representatives at the conference.

The reform has effectively promoted the growth of tertiary industry, especially the service sector, and encouraged the development of small and micro-sized enterprises, those present at the meeting agreed.

In Shanghai, the tax cut has helped reduce enterprises’ tax burdens by 22.5 billion yuan (3.57 billion U.S.dollars) in the first 10 months of this year, while in Beijing, the new measure has cut tax revenue by 2.5 billion yuan in two months.

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‘Overpowered’: Passengers Beat 2 Muslim ‘Hijackers’ to Death on Chinese Flight

The moral of this story is: Don’t try to hijack a plane in China.

Two would-be plane hijackers were beaten to death by passengers and crew aboard a flight bound for the regional Chinese capital of Urumqi on Friday, The Global Times reports. The men died in the hospital from the injuries they suffered at the hands of those whom they thought would be their victims.

There were a total of six men involved in the foiled plot to hijack the Tianjin Airlines flight. All of the men were reportedly Uyghurs, a local Muslim ethnic minority.

Less than 10 minutes after the plane took off from Hotan airport in southwest Xinjiang, China at 12:25 a.m., the men, aged 20 to 36, announced their intentions to horrified passengers and attempted to storm the cockpit using a “broken crutch” made of aluminum as a weapon.

But before they could get to the cockpit, they were tackled by passengers and crew members who tied them up with belts and restrained them until the plane made it back to the airport about 20 minutes later. There were reportedly 92 passengers and 9 crew members on the flight.

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China rounds up activists on Tiananmen anniversary

Chinese authorities have rounded up hundreds of activists in the capital Beijing, rights campaigners and petitioners said Monday, as they marked the 23rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown.

The detentions came as Washington angered Beijing by calling for all those still jailed over the demonstrations on June 4, 1989 — when hundreds, if not thousands, of protesters were shot and killed by soldiers — to be freed.

The anniversary of the brutal army action in the heart of Beijing is always hugely sensitive, but particularly so this year ahead of a once-a-decade handover of power marred by fierce in-fighting in the ruling Communist Party.

“They brought in a lot of buses and were rounding up petitioners at the Beijing South rail station on Saturday night,” Zhou Jinxia, a petitioner from northeast China’s Liaoning province, told AFP.

“There were between 600 to 1,000 petitioners from all over China. We were processed, we had to register and then they started sending people back to their home towns.”

Police made it clear that the round up of petitioners — people who gather at central government offices in Beijing to seek redress for rights violations in their localities — was to prevent them from protesting on June 4, she said.

China still considers the June 4 demonstrations a “counter-revolutionary rebellion” and has refused to acknowledge any wrongdoing or consider compensation for those killed, more than two decades later.

The government attempts to block any public discussion or remembrance of the events by hiding away key dissidents in the run-up to June 4 each year, taking them into custody or placing them under house arrest.

Any mention of the 1989 protests is banned in Chinese state media, and the subject is largely taboo in China. Searches on China’s popular social media sites for June 4, the number 23 and the word “candle” were blocked on Monday.

Despite the heightened security, numerous public events have been held around the nation to commemorate the “Tiananmen massacre” and demand democratic reforms.

More than 80 rights campaigners met in a Beijing square on Saturday, carrying banners and shouting slogans calling for a reassessment of the 1989 protests.

“We shouted ‘down with corruption’, and ‘protect our rights’,” Wang Yongfeng, a Shanghai activist, who attended the protest, told AFP.

“So many people were killed on June 4, we think the government should fully account for what happened.”

Photographs of the Saturday protest posted online showed demonstrators with large placards that said “remember our struggle for democracy, freedom and rights as well as those heroes who met tragedy.”

A similar protest occurred in a park in southeast China’s Guiyang city last week, with police subsequently taking into custody at least four of the organisers of the event, the Chinese Human Rights Defenders group said on its website.

The US State Department on Sunday called on Beijing to release those still serving sentences for their participation in the 1989 demonstrations and do more to protect the human rights of its citizens.

But foreign ministry spokesman Liu Weimin hit back a day later, saying Beijing expressed “strong dissatisfaction and firm opposition” to what he said were “groundless accusations”.

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UN to Regulate the Internet?

The Hill is reporting that the United States House of Representatives is due to consider an international proposal that would give the United Nations more control over the Internet sometime next week.

Backed by China, Russia, Brazil, India and other members of the international body, the proposal is drawing fire on both sides of the aisle in Congress, as members of the Obama administration even move to criticize it.

“We’re quite concerned,” said Larry Strickling, the head of the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration.

He described the measure as “top-down regulation where it’s really the governments that are at the table, but the rest of the stakeholders aren’t.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) also pointed out that China and Russia “aren’t exactly bastions of Internet freedom,” and just because they support a measure, that’s not exactly a reason to follow suit.

Pledging to guard the issue, Rubio elaborated: “Any place that bans certain terms from search should not be a leader in international Internet regulatory frameworks.”

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