GOP legally barred from fighting vote fraud

Voting machines suspiciously defaulting to Barack Obama? Buses loaded with strangers appearing at polling stations? Even ballots turning out 100 percent for one candidate in precinct reports?

In short, suspicions of vote fraud?

That’s too bad, because a race-based consent decree negotiated by Democrats against the Republican National Committee a generation ago still has tied the RNC’s hands, and GOP officials could be cited for contempt – or worse – if they try to make sure American elections are clean.

Impossible?

No. Fact.

The case is the Democratic National Committee vs. the Republican National Committee, originally from 1982.

Democrats alleged Republicans were trying intimidate minority voters in New Jersey and brought the legal action. The RNC, inexplicably, decided to agree to a consent decree before a Democrat-appointed judge rather than fight the claims.

The judge, Dickinson Debevoise, appointed by Jimmy Carter, later retired but decided he would continue to control the case. The decision requires the RNC – but not the DNC – to “refrain from undertaking any ballot security activities in polling places or election districts where the racial or ethnic composition of such districts is a factor in the decision to conduct, or the actual conduct of, such activities there and where a purpose or significant effect of such activities is to deter qualified voters from voting; and the conduct of such activities disproportionately in or directed toward districts that have a substantial proportion of racial or ethnic populations shall be considered relevant evidence of the existence of such a factor and purpose.”

The rest of the agreement essentially requires the RNC to follow applicable state and federal election laws.

Read more here.

Voting Machines in Battleground States Switching Romney Votes for Obama

After complaints from voters in at least six states that their intended votes for Mitt Romney on electronic touchscreen voting machines came up as votes for President Barack Obama, the Republican National Committee (RNC) sent a letter to election officials in six states — Ohio, Nevada, Kansas, North Carolina, Missouri and Colorado — asking them to more strictly monitor their electronic voting machines on Election Day.

John R. Phillippe, Jr. sent a letter to election officials in those six states and asked them to, among other things, “re-calibrate all voting machines on the morning of Election Day before the polls open, or, if necessary, the day before the election” and “make arrangements for additional technicians on Election Day in case of increased calibration problems.”

The RNC also asked election officials to “issue guidance requiring polling place officials to prominently post a sign reminding voters to double-check that the voting machine properly recorded their vote before final submission” and another requiring “polling place officials to remind voters to double-check that the voting machine properly recorded their vote before final submission, and to note that poll workers should be notified and can assist in the case of a voting machine error.”

In North Carolina, an early voter who wanted to vote for Romney saw her vote for him come up as an Obama vote twice before she was able to cast her ballot for Romney.

The same thing happened to a voter in Ohio, when Joan Stevens hit Romney’s name on her touchscreen only to see Obama’s name come up — twice.

“I don’t know if it happened to anybody else or not, but this is the first time in all the years that we voted that this has ever happened to me,” Stevens told Fox News. “Maybe you make a mistake once, but not three times,” she told Fox News.

Read more here.

Democrat withdraws from 1st District congressional race after allegations she voted in two states

Wendy Rosen, the Democratic challenger to Republican Rep. Andy Harris in the 1st Congressional District, withdrew from the race Monday amid allegations that she voted in elections in both Maryland and Florida in 2006 and 2008.

It was unclear, however, whether she could remove her name from the ballot with the election less than two months away. Under state law, a candidate has until 70 days before an election to remove his or her name from the ballot. The deadline for the Nov. 6 election passed on Aug. 28.

Democratic leaders — who raised the allegations, urged Rosen to step aside and notified prosecutors — said they would gather Central Committee members this month to identify a write-in candidate for the district, which includes the Eastern Shore and parts of Harford, Carroll, Cecil and Baltimore counties.

Republicans, meanwhile, said the allegations prove that voter fraud is real and called on Democrats to join the GOP in calling for reforms.

Rosen, 57, a Cockeysville businesswoman and Maryland voter, told The Baltimore Sun that she registered to vote in Florida several years ago in order to support a “very close friend” running for the St. Petersburg City Council and to vote on local issues there.

Read more here.

Will THIS devious group steal your vote?

A powerful group focused on “racial justice” – with leaders who have personally donated tens of thousands of dollars to the Obama campaign and the DNC – is leading the leftist-driven charge to weaken voter ID laws in key states before the November election.

The Advancement Project describes itself as a “multi-racial civil rights organization” that works “‘on the ground’ helping organized communities of color dismantle and reform the unjust and inequitable policies that undermine the promise of democracy.” The organization states, ” Simultaneously, we have aggressively sought and seized opportunities to promote this approach to racial justice.”

It was founded in 1999 and has offices in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

Massive assault on voter ID laws

Just last week, a federal court struck down a Texas law requiring voters to present a government-issued photo ID before casting a ballot. According to the organization website, “Advancement Project intervened as defendants in this federal litigation in support of the Department of Justice’s position that Texas’ Photo ID law is racially retrogressive and should be denied preclearance under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act.”

Prior to the ruling, on Sept. 13, 2011, the Advancement Project sent a letter to the Justice Department, calling on the Civil Rights Division to reject the voter ID law. It also delivered a petition of 120,000 signatures demanding the department deny pre-clearance of Texas’ law.

And on Aug. 27, U.S. District Judge Algenon Marbley struck down Ohio’s “wrong precinct” law.

“In the lawsuit, brought on the behalf of several labor and community organizations, attorneys from Advancement Project and Service Employees International Union argued that Ohio’s law unconstitutionally penalizes thousands of voters for poll worker errors that disproportionately impacted African Americans,” the Advancement Project stated on its website.

Read more here.

Federal Court: ID needed for beer and wine, not for Voting

A federal court has ruled against a Texas law that would require voters to present photo IDs to election officials before being allowed to cast ballots in November.

A three-judge panel in Washington ruled Thursday that the law imposes “strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor” and noted that racial minorities in Texas are more likely to live in poverty.

Read more here.

NAACP(Fraudulently) Warns of ‘Massive…State-Sponsored Voter Suppression’ Against Blacks & Hispanics