Posts Tagged ‘politics’

At least a 100 head of cattle will be released by the Bureau of Land Management from a corral outside of Mesquite, according to a deal struck by upset ranchers and BLM agents in the latest development in the roundup of Cliven Bundy’s cattle, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The BLM, upset that Bundy has refused to pay federal grazing fees, rounded up at least one-third of Bundy’s cattle earlier this week, but on Saturday decided to halt the roundup due to safety concerns for its agents and the general public.

Interstate 15 is closed in both directions about seven miles south of Mesquite because protesters have blocked the freeway, according to Nevada Highway Patrol, KLAS-TV reported.

The protesters have gathered in support of rancher Bundy, and nearly two dozen police officers and a SWAT unit are on scene, KLAS added.

Earlier this week, the decades-long battle escalated when protesters confronted federal agents attempting to roundup Cliven Bundy’s approximately 900 “trespass cattle.”

Bundy does not own the land and has refused to pay grazing fees since 1993, contending he doesn’t recognize the federal government’s claim to the property.

“Historically, ranchers would let their cattle graze on public land, and the government didn’t stop them,” Jeremy Hudia, an Ohio attorney familiar with the legal claims being made, explained to TheBlaze in an email. “Back in the 1930s, however, the land was being harmed by all the uncontrolled grazing. So laws were passed to create a permit process to control the amount of grazing.”

“There is no ‘right’ to use public land for one’s personal gain,” he added. “If that were the case, I would start drilling for oil in Yosemite National Park.”

Read more here.

Already beset with a reputation for manipulating media and “fearing” coverage, the White House had a match tossed into its communications department Thursday when a local TV reporter aired an apparent claim that reporters routinely submit their questions in advance of the daily presidential press briefing.

By the time talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh picked up the story, Obama Press Secretary Jay Carney and some reporters in the White House press pool were denying the claim by Catherine Anaya of KPHO-TV in Phoenix, the local CBS affiliate.

Limbaugh declared “this is the kind of thing that upsets the soap opera narrative inside the Beltway.”

After airing clips of her broadcast and weighing her story against the denials, Limbaugh noted that Anaya seemed “star struck” by her visit and “didn’t sound capable of making something up, or inventing it.”

He characterized the reporter as “just ignorant enough to be trusted.”

“She either misunderstood what she saw or misunderstood what she was told,” Limbaugh said. “But, even when she was telling the story, ‘Oh, yeah, and sometimes the press secretary gets the questions in advance” – as if there’s nothing wrong with that, by the way – she didn’t sound like she thought anything wrong about that. She’s just fascinated at how it all works.”

The talk host predicted Anaya would soon be pressured to retract her story.

Read more here.

Gov. Jan Brewer on Wednesday vetoed a Republican bill that set off a national debate over gay rights, religion and discrimination and subjected Arizona to blistering criticism from major corporations and political leaders from both parties.

Loud cheers erupted outside the Capitol building immediately after Brewer made her announcement.

“My agenda is to sign into law legislation that advances Arizona,” Brewer said at a news conference. “I call them like I seem them despite the tears or the boos from the crowd. After weighing all the arguments, I have vetoed Senate Bill 1062 moments ago.”

The governor said she gave the legislation careful deliberation in talking to her lawyers, citizens and lawmakers on both sides of the debate.

Read more here.

Bloomberg reported:

President Barack Obama said that racial tensions may have softened his popularity among white voters within the last two years, according to a story posted on the New Yorker magazine’s website today.

“There’s no doubt that there’s some folks who just really dislike me because they don’t like the idea of a black president,” Obama said in the article by David Remnick, appearing in the magazine’s Jan. 27 edition.

“Now, the flip side of it is there are some black folks and maybe some white folks who really like me and give me the benefit of the doubt precisely because I’m a black president,” Obama said in his most direct comments on how race has affected his political standing since he’s been in office.

The Obama administration on Tuesday published a year-end list of the White House’s “Favorite Online Moments of 2013” to propagandize the Team Obama as masters of the Internet.

The thirteen item list, posted by Kori Schulman, Director of Online Engagement for the Office of Digital Strategy, includes boasting about making cute GIFs for Tumblr; video clips for Vine; President Barack Obama holding online sessions on Kindle, Google+ Hangout and Zillow; Obama photos being posted by the administration on Instagram and several officials joining Twitter.

Not mentioned by Ms. Schulman is even a passing acknowledgement of the world renowned failure of the Obamacare Website in October of 2013 or the exposure by Edward Snowden of the Obama administration’s monitoring and cataloguing the online activities of nearly every citizen and leader of the world.

While the Obama administration, aided by a sycophantic media, portrays itself as the hippest, cutting edgiest players on the Web, the debut of Obamacare exposed the sheer incompetence and hubris of Team Obama for all to see.

Millions of Americans wasted millions of hours trying in vain to sign up for Obamacare online or to at least get information about available plans.

As several million Americans started getting notices their health insurance would be cancelled in 2014 because of Obamacare regulations, which was contrary to promises made by Obama and his minions, the White House tried to spin its way out of culpability.

Close presidential advisor Valerie Jarrett was roundly criticized for a tweet attempting to blame insurance companies for people losing their health insurance due to Obamacare.

Read more here.

Barack Obama’s Internal Revenue Service was caught this year targeting conservative groups with harassment that included invasive probes into the content of prayers and unwarranted delays.

That issue is being worked out in court. But the IRS, nevertheless, remains on the attack, proposing new regulations that would silence the president’s critics.

Mathew Staver, founder and chief counsel of Liberty Counsel, said that after “being caught intentionally targeting conservative groups in the prior two elections, now the president wants his IRS to totally silence the voices of his political adversaries.”

New rules proposed in the Federal Register, Staver said, are “designed to silence and greatly restrict the activities of Liberty Counsel Action and other 501 (c) 4 nonprofit organizations during the upcoming election year.”

Read more here.

It’s been awhile since I talked about the concept of Smart Growth, but some relatively recent developments caught my eye and I figured it was time to talk about them. One of these items has been sitting on my top bookmarks for a few weeks now.

Last spring, against my advice, the voters of Salisbury elected Jake Day to their City Council. Since that time, Day has joined with nine other local elected officials around the state as part of an advisory board for Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council. This is a collaboration between the rabidly anti-growth 1,000 Friends of Maryland and Smart Growth America.

Now allow me to say that downtown development is just fine with me. My problem with so-called Smart Growth legislation – such as the Septic Bill which mandated counties provide tier maps for approval by the state, usurping local control – is that it eliminates options local landowners may choose to use. If there is a market for people who wish to live in a rural area, it should be served; moreover, many parts of the region are already off-limits to development because the land doesn’t drain properly. At least that restriction makes sense.

Developing Salisbury’s downtown is important for the city, but not squeezing rural development is important for Wicomico County.

Another recent development in the city is the adoption of designated bicycle pathways, which in Salisbury are marked by “sharrows.” Since I frequently drive in Delaware, I’m familiar with their custom of designating bicycle lanes on the shoulder of the highway, as that state seems to take the concept farther than their Maryland neighbors. But sharrows have a different purpose, simply denoting the best place to ride in a shared lane. In theory, however, a group of bikes moving along the shared lane could slow traffic down to their speed. It may seem extreme, but this has happened in larger cities.

Granted, the designated bicycle ways in Salisbury are somewhat off the beaten path of Salisbury Boulevard, which also serves as Business Route 13 in Salisbury. But the anti-parking idea expressed in the American Spectator article is a dream of Salisbury bicyclists, who want to eliminate one lane of on-street parking when downtown is revitalized. With the lower speed limits common along downtown streets, the bigger danger for bicyclists comes from a driver of a parked car unwittingly opening a car door in the path of a bicyclist rather than the large speed difference common on a highway with a bike lane.

Read more here.