NSA slapped with $20 billion class-action suit

The National Security Agency surveillance scandal could now cost the federal government and its corporate cronies a cool $20 billion or more.

The NSA, Department of Justice, President Obama, Attorney General Eric Holder and the 12 companies allegedly collaborating with the government to conduct warrantless surveillance of American citizens are all named defendants in a class action lawsuit brought by former Justice Department prosecutor Larry Klayman, founder of Freedom Watch.

“Government dishonesty and tyranny against the people have reached historic proportions,” Klayman said in a statement. “The time has come for ‘We the People’ to rise up and reclaim control of our nation.”

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks $20 billion in damages, a “cease and desist” order, expunction of all phone and communication records collected by the government through its PRISM surveillance program and “full disclosure and complete accounting” of what the named companies have allowed the DOJ and NSA to do.

The companies named in the suit include the following: Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Skype, YouTube, Apple, PalTalk, AOL and Yahoo. Combined with Verizon, which has been named in a separate class action lawsuit, the users and subscribers of these companies reportedly comprise a majority of the U.S. citizenry, thus positioning the lawsuit to pit the American people against their government and its corporate collaborators.

“This and the Verizon class action will serve to unify all political and social persuasions in our great nation to wage a second American revolution, one that is peaceful and legal – but pursued with great resolve and force,” Klayman asserted. “If not, the government will control us, and this will mark the end of individual liberties.

Read more here.

Wife saw husband, a Beaumont Army Medical Center nurse in Afghanistan, die while on Skype chat

The wife of a Beaumont Army Medical Center nurse who died Monday in Afghanistan said the incident took place while she was talking with her husband through Skype’s video chat.

Army officials have not released the cause of death for Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark, 43, of Spencerport, N.Y.

A statement from the family said they are waiting for results of a military investigation.

“Bruce’s wife tragically witnessed her husband’s death during one of their regular Skype video chats,” the statement said.

“At the time of the incident, the family was hoping for a rescue and miracle, but later learned that it was not to be,” according to the family’s statement.

“Although the circumstances were unimaginable, Bruce’s wife and extended family will be forever thankful that he and his wife were together in his last moments.”

Beaumont Army Medical
Center officials could not be reached for comment on Thursday.

U.S. and Australian special operations soldiers in Afghanistan honored Clark this week, according to the statement.

Clark was assigned to A Company, Troop Command at Beaumont.

He deployed in March to support U.S. and coalition efforts in Afghanistan.

Clark’s awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Award, Mili tary Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Medal.

Clark had two children.