TORONTO woman denied haircut by Muslim barber

Faith McGregor walked into the Terminal Barber Shop to get a haircut — the ‘businessman,’ short on the sides, tapered, trim the top. The shop doesn’t do women’s haircuts. But McGregor, 35, said she wanted a men’s cut. The Muslim shop owner refused.

Metro News Shop co-owner Omar Mahrouk told her his Muslim faith prohibits him from touching a woman who is not a member of his family. All the other barbers said the same thing. (What they didn’t tell her was if they found out she was a homosexual, they would have to cut her throat, according to their faith)
“For me it was just a haircut and started out about me being a woman. Now we’re talking about religion versus gender versus human rights and businesses in Ontario,” said McGregor. She filed a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario almost immediately, saying she felt like a “second-class citizen.”

Read more here.

A concerned Toronto citizen speaks out about corruption with Canada Immigration. Monica Willie Immigration Consultant, has a lot of explaining to do

just came across your website, I felt I had to write to you. I have encountered corruption with Canada immigration, Once you enter into this corrupted system, your life will slowly be destroyed. I have been married to a 3rd generation Canadian man for the last 7 years,and still have not got landed immigrant papers.I am surprised my marriage is still intact after all the stress we endured .My husband did tried to commit suicide in 2010, he could not take the pressure anymore, but lucky enough he failed.

My 2 boys who I brought here from the United Kingdom have suffered tremendously , both of my boys also tried to take they own life’s, one tried to jump in-front of the Subway train, the other was found hanging in Highed Park in Toronto ,both were blessed that 2 kind Canadians saved they life’s.We had corrupted Lawyers and the latest was a lady who claimed to be an immigration consultant Monica Willie.She took my money and now claims she never knew me. I research her name on the computer,and came cross a few articles about her http://www.thestar.com/news/article/226066–charity-for-a-price she is the same lady..I contacted Canadian immigration and I was told, that has nothing to do with them. Now my sons and I facing deportation, because of a corrupted system, You would not believe what , We as a family have endured.

My older son I can say , has graduated with honorees from the High School here in Toronto .My youngest boy,unfortunately has been destroyed by the system.He has been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder , anxiety disorder , conduct disorder ,and major depressive disorder , From an A grade student he has become a broken soul. For myself, I am a nursery Nurse for special needs children, and my dream was to become Mental health Nurse in Canada to further my education, but It looks like I am not good enough for this country. Should I get deported, I will get deported to Germany, and my sons will be deported to The United Kingdom.

Read more here.

“I’ll tie you all up and throw you all in a lake of fire if you show up at the Salahuddin mosque … every dog will be shot on the spot”

A Facebook page inviting people to walk their dogs outside an east-Toronto mosque is becoming a hotbed of hostility, with Muslims threatening to kill dogs and their owners if they dare show up for ‘Walk your dog in front of the mosque Day.’

TORONTO SUN (H/T Susan K) The Facebook page emerged in the wake of the Al-Quds Islamic rally held at Queen’s Park just over a week ago. The yearly anti-Israel demonstration, started by Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979, was also attended by counter protestors, one of whom was a Jewish man who brought his 160-pound English Mastiff.

Allan Einstoss was arrested by police after getting into a scuffle when he was told by Muslim demonstrators to keep his dog away. His dog, Cupcake, was also kicked by at least on Muslim demonstrator.

Read more here.

Police arrest more than 400 after vandalism at Toronto economic summit

une 26: A protester kicks a burnt-out car as a police vehicle burns in the background during an anti-G-20 demonstration in Toronto. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Ryan Remiorz)

TORONTO (AP) — Police made more than 400 arrests after black-clad demonstrators broke off from a crowd of peaceful protesters at the global economic summit and went on a rampage in downtown Toronto that lasted into the early morning hours, authorities said Sunday.

The roving band of protesters torched four police cruisers and shattered shop windows with baseball bats and hammers for blocks, including at police headquarters, then shed some of their black clothes, revealing other garments, and continued their rampage.

Police used shields, clubs, tear gas and pepper spray to push back the protesters who tried to head south toward the security fence surrounding the Group of 20 summit site. Some demonstrators hurled rocks and bottles at police.

The vandalism occurred just blocks from where U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders were meeting and staying.

“What we saw yesterday is a bunch of thugs that pretend to have a difference of opinion with policies and instead choose violence to express those so-called differences of opinion,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s chief spokesman Dimitri Soudas said Sunday.

Toronto Police Sgt. Tim Burrows said Sunday that at least 412 people had been arrested in the rampage that began Saturday afternoon. Those arrested were taken to a temporary holding center constructed for the summit.

The streets of downtown Toronto were quiet at daylight, but Burrows said police were expecting a large protest later Sunday morning at a park near the detention center.

Burrows said many of the violent protesters were Canadian. He added that authorities had known of their plans for some time.

“We’re not sure we have the leaders, but we have a large proportion of those people and the people who decided they wanted to be influenced by these violent protesters and join with their cause,” Burrows said. “A lot of them were home grown. There’s a lot of Canadian talent in the group.”

Thousands of police headed to Toronto to reinforce security there after the smaller Group of Eight summit ended Saturday in Huntsville, Ontario, about 140 miles (225 kilometers) away. Security was being provided by an estimated 19,000 law enforcement officers drawn from across Canada, and security costs were estimated at more than US$900 million.

Saturday’s protests began with a peaceful march, sponsored by labor unions and dubbed family friendly, that was the largest demonstration planned during the summit weekend. Its organizers had hoped to draw a crowd of 10,000, but only about half that number turned out on a rainy day.

Police in riot gear and riding bikes formed a blockade, keeping protesters from approaching the steel and concrete security fence a few blocks south of the march route. Police closed a stretch of Toronto’s subway system along the protest route and the largest shopping mall downtown closed after the protest took a turned for the worse.

The black-clad demonstrators broke off from the larger crowd of peaceful protesters and began torching police cars and smashing shop windows.

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair said the goal of the militant protesters was to draw police away from the security perimeter of the summit so that fellow protesters could attempt to disrupt the meeting.

Some police officers were struck by rocks and bottles and assaulted, but none was injured badly enough to stop working, Blair said.

“We have never seen that level of wanton criminality and vandalism and destruction on our streets,” Blair said.

Previous global summit protests have turned violent. In 1999, 50,000 protesters shut down World Trade Organization sessions in Seattle as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets. There were some 600 arrests and $3 million in property damage. One man died after clashes with police at a G-20 meeting held in London in April 2009.

At the September G-20 summit in Pittsburgh, police fired canisters of pepper spray and smoke and rubber bullets at marchers.

Thousands protest summit in Canada; vandals smash windows, torch police cars

June 26, 2010: Riot police walk by a burning police car in downtown Toronto during anti G20 protests.

TORONTO (AP) — Black-clad demonstrators broke off from a crowd of peaceful demonstrators protesting a global economic summit in Toronto, torching police cruisers and smashing windows with baseball bats and hammers.

Police with shields and clubs earlier pushed back another small group of demonstrators who tried to head south toward the security fence surrounding the perimeter of the Group of 20 summit site. Some demonstrators hurled bottles at police.

“This isn’t our Toronto and my response is anger,” Toronto Mayor David Miller told CP24 television. “Every Torontonian should be outraged by this.”

The roving band of protesters in black balaclavas shattered shop windows for blocks, including at police headquarters, then shed some of their black clothes, revealing other garments, and continued to rampage through downtown Toronto.

Protesters torched at least two police cruisers in different parts of the city, including one in the heart of the city’s financial district.

Police in riot gear and riding bikes formed a blockade, keeping protesters from approaching the security fence a few blocks south of the march route. Police closed a stretch of Toronto’s subway system along the protest route and the largest shopping mall downtown closed after the protest took a turn for the worse.

A media bus taking photographers and cameramen to a hotel where the G-20 leaders will have dinner was turned back after police deemed it unsafe.

Dozens of police officers later boxed in a number of protesters from both sides of a street in a shopping district. The protesters encouraged the media to film it and they sang ‘O Canada’, Canada’s national anthem, before being allowed to disperse.

At another location at the provincial legislature police also boxed in demonstrators before tackling some and making arrests.

A stream of police cars headed to Toronto to reinforce security there after the smaller Group of Eight summit ended in Huntsville, Ontario. The vandalism occurred just blocks from where President Barack Obama and other world leaders were meeting and staying.

“These images are truly shocking to Canadians,” Canadian Public Safety Minister Vic Toews said in a statement. “We are taking all measures necessary to ensure Canadians, delegates, media and international visitors remain safe.”

Previous major world summits also have attracted massive, raucous and sometimes destructive protests by anti-globalization forces.

As of Saturday afternoon, 40 summit-related arrests had been since June 18, police said, with security being provided by an estimated 19,000 law enforcement officers drawn from all regions of Canada. The security costs are estimated at more than US$900 million.

Saturday’s protest march, sponsored by labor unions and dubbed family friendly, was the largest demonstration planned during the weekend summits. Its organizers had hoped to draw a crowd of 10,000, but only about half that number turned out on what was a rainy day.

Toronto Police Sgt. Tim Burrows said before Saturday’s protest that authorities were pleased by the demonstrators’ orderly behavior. Hundreds of protesters moved through Toronto’s streets Friday, but police in riot gear intercepted them, preventing them from getting near the summit security zone downtown.

Ontario’s provincial government quietly passed a regulation earlier this month allowing police to arrest anyone who refuses to show identification or submit to searches if they come within five meters (five yards) of a security fence.

Toronto’s downtown resembles a fortress, with a big steel and concrete fence protecting the summit site.

Previous global summit protests have turned violent. In 1999, 50,000 protesters shut down World Trade Organization sessions in Seattle as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets. There were some 600 arrests and $3 million in property damage. One man died after clashes with police at a G-20 meeting held in London in April 2009.

At the September G-20 summit in Pittsburgh, police fired canisters of pepper spray and smoke and rubber bullets at marchers.